Research

Duke's research in mechanical engineering and materials science addresses fundamental and applied engineering problems in the areas noted below. We are particularly strong in unsteady aerodynamics, controls, thermodynamics, and soft materials and interfaces. Our faculty maintain strong connections with industry, and lead multi-university research efforts--providing ample opportunities for graduate students to pursue research at the forefront of their field, and develop career-relevant experience. A defining characteristics of our research is an interdisciplinary approach that leverages the strengths of Duke's many departments and schools as a top research institution.

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Research at Duke

Opportunities for Graduate Study

Doctoral and Master of Science study in mechanical engineering and materials science at Duke is highly interdisciplinary, drawing on a broad slate of faculty from across the Pratt School of Engineering. Students have considerable flexibility in crafting a graduate program that suits individual interests, with core courses that reflect faculty research strengths.

The department also offers a program of study towards the Masters of Engineering (M.Eng) in either mechanical engineering or materials science. This 30-credit degree program includes course work towards departmental requirements, an area of specialization, business and management fundamentals, and an internship or applied research experience.

October 23, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. – For the first time, scientists have observed how droplets within solids deform and burst under high electric voltages. This is important, the Duke University engineers who made the observations said, because it explains a major reason why such materials as insulation for electrical...
October 09, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. -- While climate scientists design intricate and complex models of global climates that require banks of super computers to run for weeks, a Duke University engineer believes he has developed a much simpler way to predict the Earth’s climate patterns.
August 24, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. -- A long-standing mystery in biology about the longer lifespans of bigger creatures may be explained by the application of a physical law called the Constructal Law (please link here www.constructal.org).
July 26, 2012
As a new Niels Bohr Professor, Duke engineer David Needham will establish the Center for Single Particle Science and Engineering at the University of Southern Denmark (SDU), in Odense, Denmark. One of the center’s primary goals will be to develop novel strategies for using micro and nanotechnology...
July 05, 2012
DURHAM, N.C. – The webbed fingers of the Creature from the Black Lagoon might make him successful at terrorizing unsuspecting humans, but if he wanted to swim faster and did not have webbed fingers, he should have spread his fingers anyway, which would have also made him look scarier. A Duke...
June 11, 2012
Engineered to compete and aerodynamically designed for speed, imagine a car that can go from zero to 60 miles per hour in 3.8 seconds.  When it comes to racing, what else is there?