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Research News

July 11, 2014
Two degrees plus two scan energies and one heavy metal equals a new way to detect dangerous plaques in the coronary arteries. Potentially. Jeffrey Ashton, a biomedical engineering graduate student in Duke University’s  MD-PhD program, has won an American Heart Association Fellowship to develop...
May 14, 2014
A U.S. and Korean research team has developed a chip-like device that could be scaled up to sort and store hundreds of thousands of individual living cells in a matter of minutes. The system is similar to a random access memory chip, but it moves cells rather than electrons. Researchers at Duke...
April 29, 2014
The MicroCT scanner at Duke University is available for use by anyone, whether it be a Duke researcher, a scientists from another university or someone from the private sector. The machine uses x-rays to create 3D models of objects and even lets researchers look through their interiors slice-by-...
April 14, 2014
It famously took Thomas Edison thousands of attempts to settle on a practical design for the incandescent light bulb. If each crack at a solution had cost him hundreds of millions of dollars, however, he might not have been so keen on using a build ‘em and bust ‘em approach.
March 25, 2014
For the millions of people forced to rely on a plastic tube to eliminate their urine, developing an infection is nearly a 100 percent guarantee after just four weeks. But with the help of a little bubble-blowing, biomedical engineers hope to bring relief to urethras everywhere.
March 18, 2014
Duke engineers have devised a way to improve the efficiency of lithotripsy—the demolition of kidney stones using focused shock waves. After decades of research, all it took was cutting a groove near the perimeter of the shock wave-focusing lens and changing its curvature.